Frequently Asked Questions
As the name would suggest, this section is a compilation of
answers to the questions our clients commonly ask.

  1. At what resolution should I save my photos and graphics?
  2. How long does MGTL keep files?
  3. I converted RGB to CMYK; why do you want the original RGB files?
  4. What is a "contract proof"?
  5. What's the best way to submit a disk to MGTL?
  6. Why do the printed colors look different from the colors on my screen?
  7. Do you offer storage?
  1. At what resolution should I save my photos and graphics?

    Resolution should be set to 300 dpi.

    Pictures and graphics pulled from the internet are often low resolution, typically 72 dpi or 96 dpi. Avoid these graphics, as they will appear pixilated and blocky when printed.

    Also note that you should save all photos in CMYK mode, not RGB mode when possible. Images saved in RGB mode may not print properly. If you are unable to save your image in CYMK mode, please let us know.

  2. How long does MGTL keep files?

    The final files used to produce your job are kept for three years; longer if they are part of on-going image libraries that we maintain for our clients. We don't charge for archiving job files; we do charge for the time in takes to read in tapes or disks and for any media required should you want them picked up and/or written to disk at a later date. For more information see Document Management and Archiving.

  3. I converted RGB to CMYK; why do you want the original RGB files?

    RGB is a much wider color range than CMYK. It is not a simple matter of selecting CMYK from the color mode in Photoshop; the conversion settings must be correct. If the conversion is done improperly, the color information is lost. We always prefer to have the original, at least for reference.

  4. What is a "contract proof"?
  5. What's the best way to submit a disk to MGTL?

    First, put all items in a folder labeled with the project name. Within the job folder, there should be a font folder containing all of the printer fonts and suitcases used on the job. All of the job files can be loose. Any miscellaneous files, such as previous versions or master layered files or text files you used to import into the page layout program should be in their own folder. The disk should only contain elements that pertain to the project; this avoids confusion and saves us time by not having to sort through a lot of files. Finally, check the disk. The best way is to open the fonts from the disk, then open the page layout file and check the links to make sure all images are on the disk. Printing a laser from the job disk is the best way to verify that your disk is correct.

  6. Why do the printed colors look different from the colors on my screen?

    In short, printers and monitors produce colors in different ways.

    Monitors use the RGB (red, green, blue) color model, which usually supports a wider spectrum of colors. Printers use the CMYK (cyan, magenta, yellow, black) color model, which can reproduce most—but not all—of the colors in the RGB color model. Depending on the equipment used, CMYK generally matches 85–90% of the colors in the RGB model.

    When a color is selected from the RGB model that is out of the range of the CMYK model, the application chooses what it thinks is the closest color that will match. Programs like Adobe Photoshop will allow you to choose which color will be replaced. Others may not.

  7. Do you offer storage?

    Yes. We offer free storage of most products. In some cases, minimum quantities may apply.